Word Meaning, Summary, Important Questions Of Chapter 7 Glimpses of India | Class 10

Hindi Meaning Of Difficult Words | Chapter 7 Glimpses of India

S.No.WordMeaningsMeanings (in hindi)Synonyms
1Surgerya place where a doctor, dentist or other medical practitioner treats or advises patientsशल्य चिकित्साabscission, Enucleation, incision.
2Burly(a person) large and strong; heavily builtबलवानstout, forcible, Brawny
3Drillersomeone who works at the drilling controls on the rig floorबरमा चलाने वाला………………
4Contemplationdeep reflective thoughtचिंतनspeculation, rumination
5Abruptlysuddenly and unexpectedlyअचानक Circumstantial, suddden, unexpectedly
6Perceptivehaving or showing sensitive insightभेदकclairvoyant, cathartic, perceptive
7Listlesslacking energy or enthusiasmउदासीनindifferent, nostalgic, effortless
8Premonitiona strong feeling that something is about to happenपूर्व-सूचना presage, prognostication
9Iridescentshowing luminous colours that seem to change when seen from different angles रंग-बिरंगmottled, dappled, patchy
10Bachused as a term of endearment, often after a personal nameबाल्यावस्था………………..
11Smiled faintlysmiling with less energy or a smile that lacks spiritबेहोश होकर मुस्कुराया………………..
12Fretbe constantly or visibly anxious; worryझल्लाहटtantrum
13Overwroughtin a state of anxiety; tiredअति उत्तेजितtense, agitated, nervous
14Snatchmanage to take (here)ग्रहण करनाoutshine, take, receive
15Queerstrange; oddविचित्रdappled, strange, striking
16Lethargylack of energy and enthusiasmसुस्तीidling, parasitism, stolidity,
17Rustlemake a soft, muffled crackling soundसरसराहटrustle, sough, susurration
18Probinginquiring closelyजांचexamine, explore, check
19Muddlednot arranged in order; untidyअव्यवस्थितdisarrangement, inorganization
20Morbidly in an abnormal and unhealthy mannerअस्वस्थsick, distressed, unwell
21Sordidlymeanly selfish, self-seekingअनैतिकunethical, unlawful, aberrant
22Shrewish (of a woman) bad-tempered or aggressively assertiveझगड़ालूquarrelsome, cantankerous, spiky
23Dismalcausing a mood of gloom or depressionनिराशाजनकdismal, irrecoverably
24Wincemake a slight involuntary grimace or shrinking movement of the body out of pain or distressझिझकhesitation, shrink, reluctate
25Idyllic like an idyll; extremely happy, peaceful, or picturesqueसुखद जीवन peaceable, restful
26Resentfulfeeling or expressing bitterness or indignation at having been treated unfairlyक्रोधितquick tempered, edgy, huffy
27Broodinglypreoccupied with depressing, morbid, or painful memories or thoughtsविचारमग्नworry about
28Resuscitate revive someone from the unconsciousnessपुनर्जीवितregenerate, reinvigorate,
29Etherused as an anaestheticईथरcosmos, paradise
30Haste excessive speed or urgency of movement or action; hurryजल्दीhurry, expeditiousness, Flurry
31Franticconducted in a hurried, excited, and disorganized wayउत्तेजितthrilled, galvanised, crazy
32Ebbing(of an emotion or quality) gradually decreaseक्षीण होनाdecay, dull
33Hypodermicrelating to the region immediately beneath the skinअन्तर्त्वचीयsyringe
34Unsparinglygenerousउदारतापूर्वकlavishly, munificently, obligingly
35Flaccidlifelessनिष्प्राणInanimate, defunct, Exanimate
36Unavailingachieving littleथोड़ा प्राप्त करनाaccomplish
37Tallowthe hard fat of animals melted and used to make soap, candles etc.वसाfat, grease, pulp
38Giddyweakचक्कर लाने वालाvertiginous
39Slashedslitघटाgash, lacerate
40Lolledhang looselyशिथिल होनाdallying, goldbricking, loafing
41Haggardlooking exhausted and unwellदुबला-पतलाweakly, bony, skinny
42Faltered lose strength or momentumडगमगानाfalter, dodder, toddle
43Heaveproduce a sighउसांसbulge, upsurge
44Ewer a large jug with a wide mouth, formerly used for carrying waterसुराही water jug, pitcher
45Plunging falling steeplyजल्दी से आगे बढ़नेवालाdive, dive
46Stark completeपूराthoroughly, finished
47Consternationa feeling of anxiety or dismay, typically at something unexcitedआतंकpanic, terror
48Draggleddirty or wet, typically from being trailed through mud or waterमैला करनाdefilement, mackle
49Stumblingtripping or losing balance while walking; moving with difficultyठोकरlose one's balance, founder, slip
50Soppingsaturated with liquid; wet throughभीगा हुआwet, moist, , humid,
51Whimperedsay something in a low, feeble voice that expresses fear, pain, or unhappinessबच्चे का सा रोनाcry, sniffle, snivel
52Pigmylittle (here)ठिंगनाvery small person, little person
53Convulsiveviolent; uncontrollableऐंठनspasmodic, jerky

About The Poet | Chapter 7 Glimpses of India

INTRODUCTION

Glimpses of India is a collection of three beautifully written narratives that highlight the rich diversity of India, its culture and its many hues. The writers put before us three varied regions of India, each unique, diverse and well known.

Written by Lucio Rodrigues, ‘A Baker from Goa’ is a pen portrait of a traditional Goan village baker that still has an important place in his village. Goa is the place which has the varied culture of French, English and Portuguese. In this lesson the nostalgic description of a village baker gives us a glimpse of the old days when Portuguese colonized this area.

Coorg is a factual narrative, written by Lokesh Abrol. The narrative describes this beautiful land and its many attractions including its culture, landscape, crops, flora and fauna. Coorg lies midway between Mysore and Mangalore. The description is a vivid and engaging account of this beautiful piece of heaven’, as the writer admiringly calls Coorg.

“Tea from Assam”, written by Arup Kumar Dutta is an informative story, which revolves around the tea garden of Assam. Assam produces the best tea in the world and is a land of vast tea gardens.

Short Summary Of Chapter 7 Glimpses of India In English

SUMMARY

 

PART-1: A BAKER FROM GOA

-Lucio Rodrigues

In this section of ‘Glimpses India’ the writer, Lucio Rodriguez, tells us about the bakers of Goa. He describes how the baker commanded an important position in Goan community. He recounts his childhood memories of the baker and recalls how the baker came sounding his bamboo staff. The baker placed the basket and the imploring children surrounded him to look into the basket to check what varieties of breads he carried. They bought the fragrant loves and even ate without brushing. The baker holds an important place in the hearts and customs of a Goan vllage. Marriage gifts are meaningless without the sweet bread called “bol”. Cakes and bolinhas are a must for festival. Their peculiar dress is known as “kabai” as they themselves are known as ‘pader’. They live a satisfied life as life as they earn well.

 

PART-II: COORG

-Lokesh Abrol

Coorg is a narrative written by Lokesh Abrol. It is the smallest district of Karnataka. It lies midway between Mysore and Mangalore. It is a hilly place of brave men, beautiful women and wild creatures. It is also known by the name of ‘Kodagu’. It is the home of evergreen forests, spices and coffee plantations. It rains heavily during the monsoons and the visitors keep away. But the months from September to March are very pleasant. The air breathes of refreshing coffee, The Coorgis live a life of complete independence. It is believed that they have descended from the Greeks or the Arabs. According to the Greek theory, it is said that a part of Alexander’s army found it impossible to go back and was left here. The martial traditions of the Greeks, their marriage and religious rites are quite visible among the Coorg people. According to Arab theory, the Kuppia( A long, black coat with an embroidered belt) worn by Kodavus resembles the Kuffia worn by the Arabs and the Kurds. The area is rich in wild life. The most popular adventure sports are rafting, canoeing, rappelling, rock climbing and mountain the biking. The Nisargadhama island is a lovely island beyond the Brahmagiri hills. This place is also home to Buddhist monks.

 

PART-III: TEA FROM ASSAM

-Arup Kumar

Datta Rajvir’s classmate in school in Delhi. Pranjol’s father is the manager of a tea garden in Upper Assam and Pranjol has invited Rajvir to visit his home during the summer vacation. Rajvir visits Assam in a train with Pranjol and he keeps taking pleasures of the scenery. They arrive at Mariani junction and then at the tea garden of Pranjol’s father. Almost eighty crore cups of tea are drunk every day in the whole world. About the origin of the tea it is said that a Buddhist monk while meditating felt sleepy. To avoid it he cut his eye lids and threw them. Few saplings sprouted out of them. It is said they were tea leaves that banished sleep after boiling and drinking it. The other under current story lies like this that a king in China was in habit of drinking water after boiling it. Few twigs fell into his boiling water. After drinking it, his sleep went off. They called it tea. Tea was first drunk in China as far back as 2700 BC. Chai and chini words have their origin in China. Tea from Assam is supposed to be the best kind of tea in the whole world. The best yield comes from May to July every year.

TITLE JUSTIFICATION

TITLE JUSTIFICATION

The title, Glimpses of India’ is justified as the three pieces of writing highlight the rich diversity of India. The first account describes the special place of a baker in the life of the Goan people. The baker has a role in not only the life of the people but also on special occasions like marriages. He is a regular visitor in households as he supplies breads of various types. He is eagerly awaited by the adults and children alike and is a prominent pillar of the traditional life of Goa.

The second account describes Coorg. It proudly describes the splendor of region and its various aspects with great admiration. Coorg is also known by the name of Kodagu”. The Coorg people live a life of complete independence. Kodavus or Coorgis are known for their bravery and hospitality.

Tea from Assam is a story that revolves around the world famous tea that Assam produces. It also describes the legends and practices associated with tea.

THEME

THEME

Through the nostalgic narrative. A Baker from Goa”, the writer wishes to acquaint the readers with the traditions of Goa and especially one which is of Portuguese descent the traditional bakers of Goa. He narrates their special place in the community and describes a typical baker-his appearance, job profile and his role in the community.

The theme of this narrative piece is an exploration of Coorg -a region in Karnataka. The account is informative and descriptive and presents to the reader Coorg and its many interesting aspects like its culture, landscape, crops. flora and fauna. The writer also traces the ancestry of the

Coorgis and presents to the reader in depth the study of this region which he fondly calls a piece of heaven’. Tea from Assam explores the region of Assam and the many practices and legends associated with tea growing.

THEME

Through the nostalgic narrative. A Baker from Goa”, the writer wishes to acquaint the readers with the traditions of Goa and especially one which is of Portuguese descent the traditional bakers of Goa. He narrates their special place in the community and describes a typical baker-his appearance, job profile and his role in the community.

The theme of this narrative piece is an exploration of Coorg -a region in Karnataka. The account is informative and descriptive and presents to the reader Coorg and its many interesting aspects like its culture, landscape, crops. flora and fauna. The writer also traces the ancestry of the

Coorgis and presents to the reader in depth the study of this region which he fondly calls a piece of heaven’. Tea from Assam explores the region of Assam and the many practices and legends associated with tea growing.

MESSAGE

MESSAGE

Glimpses of India conveys a strong message of the amazing diversity of India. The first account is an observation of life of a typical baker and his place in the traditional Goan society. It is an engaging narrative s which brings home to the readers the life and times of the traditional bakers who were an important and inseparable part of the life of this community. The account about Coorg is informative and descriptive and presents to the reader Coorg and its many interesting aspects like its culture, landscape, crops, flora and fauna. Tea from Assam explores the region of Assam and the many practices and legends associated with tea growing. Though far from each other the three regions give a good idea of how varied yet unique are the three regions in their importance, culture and landscape.

CHARACTER SKETCH

CHARACTER SKETCH

PART-1: A BAKER FROM GOA

 

  1. Baker

The author describes vividly the job, manners, and his indispensable role in Goan society. The description of the narrator’s excitement at the arrival of the baker to his home to deliver breads is extremely interesting The bakers usually had plump physiques as their profession was apparently a profitable one and thus they ate well. Hence, the writer humorously observes that the baker had a ‘jackfruit-like’ appearance and his family, and his servants always looked well fed. happy and prosperous. All these delightful observations make the baker quite an engaging character who was indespensible to Goan society.

 

  1. The Narrator

In A Baker from Goa’ Lucio Rodrigues, describes baker and his place in the traditional Goan society It is an engaging narrative which brings home to the readers the life and times of the traditional bakers who were an important and inseparable part of the life of this community. Also it tells us much about the author’s own temperament. The author describes vividly the job, manners, and his indispensable role in Goan society. The description of the narrator’s excitement at the arrival of the baker to his home to deliver breads is extremely interesting. The bakers usually had plump physiques as their profession was apparently a profitable one and thus they ate well. Hence, the writer humorously observes that the baker had a jackfruit-like’ appearance and his family, and his servants always looked well fed, happy and prosperous. All these delightful observations show how the writer was fond of the baker. He seems to have a lot of love, fondness, and admiration for the baker.

 

PART-II: COORG

 

  1. Coorgis

The author describes the character of Coorgi people as being fiercely independent and brave. According to one theory, they are of Greek descent. It is said that they are the successors of a part of Alexander’s army who came to Southern India and settled there when return to their native land became impractical. They then married among the locals and got absorbed in the indigenous culture, but their religious rites and traditions are distinct from those of the Hindus. They are a martial race and they love to relate stories about the courage of their people. According to another theory, they are of Arab descent. This is evident from the dress they wear. There is resemblance between’ Kuppia’, a long dress that the Coorgis wear, and ‘Kuffia’ that the Arabs and Kurds wear.

 

PART-III: TEA FROM ASSAM

 

  1. Pranjol and Rajvir

Pranjol, a youngster from Assam, is Rajvir’s classmate in school in Delhi. Pranjol’s father is the manager of a tea garden in Upper Assam and he has invited Rajvir to visit his home during the summer vacation. Rajvir visits Assam in a train with Pranjol and he keeps taking pleasures of the scenery. They arrive at Mariani junction and then at the tea garden of Pranjol’s father. Both are excited about being together. While Pranjol is not enthusiastic about visiting the tea gardens, for Rajvir it is the first experience of visiting the tea gardens of Assam. The narrative recounts the many legends associated with tea. This suggests that he is fond of reading and learning. When he remarks that the second flush’ of tea sprouting occurs between May and June, Pranjol’s father is quite surprised at his deep study of tea growing.

 

GLOSSARY

Furnaces- enclosure producing great heat;

Extinguished- put out fire or light;

Heralding-announcing;

Parapet- ramparts.

 

Martial- ready to fight;

Colonial- pertaining to a colony rule:

Canopies- Hanging covers that form a shelter,

Fiercely-ferociously;

Laidback-relaxed;

Panoramic view- a view of wide area, a situation or topic as if viewed from an altitude of land;

Ochre-yellowish orange colour.

 

Ardent- enthusiastic or passionate;

Twigs- slender woody shoots growing from a branch or steam;

Beverage-a drink other than water,

Clatter-a loud rattling sound as a hard objects striking each other;

Veered-change direction suddenly:

Pruned-cut branches of plants;

Sprouting- growing.

TYPE I: REFERENCE TO CONTEXT (VERY SHORT ANSWER QUESTIONS)

TYPE I: REFERENCE TO CONTEXT

(VERY SHORT ANSWER QUESTIONS)

Read the extracts and answer the following questions:

 

PART-1: A BAKER FROM GOA

  1. Once, when he set out in the morning on his selling round, and then again, when he returned after emptying his huge basket. The jingling thud of his bamboo woke us up from sleep and we ran to meet and greet him. Why was it so? Was it for the love of the loaf? Not at all. The loaves were bought by some Paskine or Bastine, the maid-servant of the house! What we longed for were those bread bangles which we chose carefully.

Questions

 

(i) Who is referred to as ‘he’ in the above lines?

(ii) What was carried in the basket?

(iii) Who brought the loaves of bread?

(iv) What were the children excited about?

Answers

(i) The baker is referred to as ‘he’.

(ii) The baker carried loaves of bread in his basket.

(iii) The loaves were bought by some Paskine or Bastine and the maid-servant of the house.

(iv) The children were excited about the bread bangles that the baker brought to sell.

 

  1. We kids would be pushed aside with a mild rebuke and the loaves would be delivered to the servant. But we would not give up. We would climb a bench or the parapet and peep into the basket, somehow. I can still recall the typical fragrance of those loaves. Loaves for the elders and the bangles for the children.

Questions

(i)Who are ‘we’ in the extract?

(ii) Why were the children pushed aside?

(iii) What does the writer still remember?

(iv) What was there in the basket?

Answers

(i) We’ in the extract refers to the narrator and his friends.

(ii) The children were pushed aside so that the breads may be delivered to the servants.

(iii) The writer still remembers the appetizing fragrance of the bread loaves.

(iv) There were some loaves for the elders and some bangles for the children.

 

  1. Then we did not even care to brush our teeth or wash our mouths properly. And why should we? Who would take the trouble of plucking the mango-leaf for the toothbrush?. And why was it necessary at all? The tiger never brushed his teeth.

Questions

(i) Which time is the speaker talking about?

(ii) Why would the children not brush their teeth?

(iii) What was used as a toothbrush in those days?

(iv) In what sense does the narrator mention the tiger?

Answers

(i) The speaker is talking about his childhood days in Goa.

(ii) The children would not bother to brush because they could not wait to eat the fragrant bread that the baker brought.

(iii) A mango leaf was used to brush teeth in those days.

(iv) It is said that tigers never brush their teeth. The narrator jokingly alludes to this to justify not brushing their teeth.

 

  1. The baker or bread-seller of those days had a peculiar dress known as the kabai. It was a single-piece long frock reaching down to the knees. In our childhood we saw bakers wearing a shirt and trousers which were shorter than full-length ones and longer than half pants. Even today, anyone who wears a half pant which reaches just below the knees invites the comment that he is dressed like a pader!

Questions

(i) What did the baker wear in those days?

(ii) Why was it peculiar?

(iii) What did the bakers wear when the narrator was a child?

(iv) What is a baker called in the local language?

Answers

(i) In those days the baker wore a peculiar dress known as the kabai.

(ii) It was peculiar as it was a single-piece long frock reaching down to the knees.

(iii) In his childhood the narrator saw bakers wearing a shirt and trousers which were shorter than full length ones and longer than half pants.

(iv) In the local language the baker is called ‘pader.

 

  1. The baker usually collected his bills at the end of the month. Monthly accounts used to be recorded on some wall in pencil. Baking was indeed a profitable profession in the old days. The baker and his family never starved. He, his family and his servants always looked happy and prosperous. Their plump physique was an open testimony to this. Even today any person with a jackfruit-like physical appearance is easily compared to a baker.

Questions

(i) Where did the baker record his accounts?

(ii) Why did the baker and his family never starve?

(iii) What is well known about the bakers of Goa?

(iv) How can a baker be identified in Goa?

Answers

(i) The baker recorded his accounts on some wall in pencil.

(ii) The baker and his family never starved because baking was a profitable profession.

(iii) It is well known that a baker of Goa is bound to be plump.

(iv) Any person with a Jackfruit-like physical appearance is easily identified to a baker as their plump physique is an open testimony of their happiness and prosperity.

 

PART-II: COORG

  1. Midway between Mysore and the coastal town of Mangalore sits a piece of heaven that must have drifted from the kingdom of God. This land of rolling hills is inhabited by a proud race of martial men beautiful women and wild creatures. Coorg, or Kodagu, the smallest district of Karnataka. is home to evergreen rainforests, spices and coffee plantations.

Questions

(i) Which kind of animals are we likely to see at Coorg?

(ii) What is Coorg known for?

(iii) Why does the writer call Coorg ‘a piece of heaven’?

(iv) Where is Coorg situated?

Answers

(i) We are likely to see wild animals in Coorg.

(ii) Coorg is known for its evergreen rainforests, spices and coffee plantations.

(iii) Coorg is a land of rolling hills. So the writer calls it a piece of heaven”.

(iv) Coorg is situated between the midway of Mysore and the coastal town of Mangalore.

 

  1. The weather is perfect, with some showers thrown in for good measure. The air breathes of invigorating coffee. Coffee estates and colonial bungalows stand tucked under tree canopies in prime corners.

Questions

(i) What is the writer describing in the above lines?

(ii) What makes the weather of Coorg pleasant?

(iii) What fragrance fills the air?

(iv) What does the air smell?

Answers

(i) The writer is describing the state of Coorg.

(ii) The weather is perfect, with some showers thrown in for good measure.

(iii) The invigorating smell of coffee fills the air.

(iv) The air smells of coffee.

 

  1. Coorgi homes have a tradition of hospitality, and they are more than willing to recount numerous tales of valour related to their sons and fathers. The Coorg Regiment is one of the most decorated in the Indian Army, and the first Chief of the Indian Army, General Cariappa, was a Coorgi. Even now, Kodavus are the only people in India permitted to carry firearms without a licence.

Questions

(i) What are Coorgis proud of?

(ii) What tradition is being mentioned in the above lines?

(iii) Who was General Cariappa?

(iv) What is the Coorgi regiment known for?

Answers

(i) Coorgis are proud of the valour related to their sons and fathers.

(ii) Coorgis’ tradition of hospitality is being mentioned in the above lines.

(iii) General Cariappa was the first Chief of the Indian Army.

(iv) The Coorg Regiment is one of the most decorated, so it is famous.

 

  1. The most laidback individuals become converts to the life of high-energy adventure with river rafting, canoeing, rappelling, rock climbing and mountain biking. Numerous walking trails in this region are a favourite with trekkers.

Questions

(i) What is being described in the above lines?

(ii) What is the reference to high energy?

(iii) What are the adventure sports that Coorg has to offer?

(iv) What does Coorg offer for the avid trekker?

Answers

(i) Coorg is being described in the above lines.

(ii) “High energy refers to the adventure sports that Coorg offers.

(iii) River rafting, canoeing, rappelling, rock climbing and mountain biking are some of the adventure sports that Coorg has to offer.

(iv) Coorg offers numerous walking trails for avid trekker.

 

  1. Running into Buddhist monks from India’s largest Tibetan settlement, at nearby Bylakuppe, is a bonus. The monks, in red, ochre and yellow robes, are amongst the many surprises that wait to be discovered by visitors searching for the heart and soul of India, right here in Coorg.

Questions

(i) Where did the narrator see India’s largest Tibetan settlement?

(ii) What were the Buddhist monks wearing?

(iii) What can the visitors find in the Tibetan settlement?

(iv) Why is the narrator indebted to Coorg?

Answers

(i) He saw it near Bylakuppe.

(ii) They were wearing red, ochre and yellow robes.

(iii) They can discover the heart and soul of India.

(iv) Because he learnt about the country,

 

PART-III: TEA FROM ASSAM

  1. “Chai-garam garam-chai,” a vendor called out in a high-pitched voice. He came up to their window and asked, Chai, sa’ab?” “Give us two cups, Pranjol said. They sipped the steaming hot liquid. Almost everyone in their compartment was drinking tea too.

“Do you know that over eighty crore cups of tea are drunk every day throughout the world?” Rajvir said. Whew!” exclaimed Pranjol. “Tea really is very popular

Questions

(i) How many cups of tea are drunk everyday throughout the world?

(ii) Where were Pranjol and Rajvir when this conversation took place?

(iii) Which line brings out the popularity of tea?

(iv) Who was selling tea and where?

Answers

(i) Over eighty crore cups of tea are drunk everyday throughout the world.

(ii) Pranjol and Rajvir were in a train when this conversation took place.

(iii) The line, Almost everyone in their compartment was drinking tea too’, brings out the popularity of tea.

(iv) A tea vendor was selling tea and he was outside the window of the train compartment.

  1. Pranjol buried his nose in his detective book again. Rajvir too was an ardent fan of detective stories, but at the moment he was keener on looking at the beautiful scenery. It was green, green everywhere. Rajvir had never seen so much greenery before. Then the soft green paddy fields gave way to tea bushes.

Questions

(i) What was common between Pranjol and Rajvir?

(ii) Why was Rajvir not interested in detective stories at the moment?

(iii) Where are Pranjol and Rajvir?

(iv) What did Rajvir like about the scenery?

Answers

(i) Both Pranjol and Ranvir were fans of detective stories.

(ii) Rajvir was not interested in reading detective stories at the moment as he was attracted by the greenery outside.

(iii) They are travelling in a train.

(iv) He liked the soft green paddy fields gave way to tea bushes.

 

  1. “Oh, this is tea country now,” he said. “Assam has the largest concentration of plantations in the world. You will see enough gardens to last you a lifetime!”

Questions

(i) Who is ‘he’ referred to in the first line?

(ii) What does the speaker refer to as ‘tea country”?

(iii) Why does he call it ‘tea country?

(iv) Where is the speaker headed?

Answers

(i) ‘He’ refers to Pranjol.

(ii) He refers to Assam as ‘tea country’

(iii) Pranjol calls it ‘tea country as it has the largest concentration of plantations in the world.

(iv) The speaker is in a train and going to his father plantation with his friend.

 

  1. “Tea was first drunk in China”, Rajvir added, “as fa back as 2700 B.C.”! Infact words such as tea, ‘cha and ‘chini’ are from Chinese, Tea came to Europe only in the sixteenth century and was drunk more a medicine than as beverage.

Questions

(i) Who is Mr. Barua?

(ii) What is the reference to ‘second flush’?

(iii) Why was Pranjol’s father surprised?

(iv) How long does the sprouting period last?

Answers

(i) Mr. Barua refers to Pranjol’s father.

(ii) Second-flush or sprouting is the sprouting period of tea.

(iii) He was surprised at Rajvir’s level of knowledge about tea growing.

(iv) The sprouting period lasts from May to July and yields the best tea.

 

 

 

  1. Pranjol’s father slowed down to allow a tractor, pulling a trailer-load of tea leaves, to pass.

“This is the second-flush or sprouting period, isn’t it Mr Barua?” Rajvir asked. “It lasts from May to July and yields the best tea”. “You seem to have done your homework before coming”, Pranjol’s father said in surprise. “Yes, Mr Barua”, Rajvir admitted. “But I hope to learn much more while I’m here.”

Questions

(i) Why did Mr Barua feel surprised?

(ii) How did Rajvir want to spend his stay there?

(iii) What did Rajvir want to learn from Mr. Barua ?

(iv) What is the sprouting period of tea?

Answers

(i) Mr Barua was surprised to know that Rajvir already knew a lot about the tea gardens of Assam.

(ii) Rajvir wanted to spend his time discovering the beauty of Assam. He wanted to learn more abo the tea plantations of Assam.

(iii) Rajvir wanted to learn from Mr. Barua the interesting aspects of tea growing.

(iv) The sprouting period or the second-flush of tea lasts from May to July

 

TYPE II: SHORT ANSWER QUESTIONS (30-40 WORDS EACH)

Answer the following questions:

PART-1: A BAKER FROM GOA

 

  1. What are the elders in Goa nostalgic about?

Ans. The elders in Goa are nostalgic about the good old Portuguese days and their love of bread and loaves. The writer says that the caters of loaves have left but the makers still exist Baking is still a profitable occupation and the bakers still have a role to play in the society of Goa.

 

  1. Is bread-making still popular in Goa? How do you Know?

Ans. Yes, according to the narrative, bread making is still popular in Goa This is very clear from the narrator’s statement that the eaters have gone away leaving the makers behind. There are mixers, moulders and the ones who bake the loaves. The time tested furnaces still exist there there.

 

  1. When would the baker come everyday? Why did the children run to meet him?

Ans. The baker would come twice a day. Once early in the morning and the second time when he returned after selling his stuff. The children would run to t him as they wanted to have bread-bangles. meet His arrival was eagerly awaited by the children even though they were rebuked by their parents.

 

  1. What did the bakers wear: (i) in the Portuguese days? (ii) when the author was young?

Ans. In the portuguese days the baker used to wear a peculiar dress known as the kabai. It was a single piece long frock reaching down to the knees. In our childhood we saw bakers wearing a shirt and trousers which were shorter than full-length ones and longer than half pants. Even today, anyone who wears a half pant which reaches just below the knees invites the comment that he is dressed like a pader.

 

  1. Who invites the comment “he is dressed like a pader? Why?

Ans. Anyone wearing a half-pant with its length reaching just below the knees, invites the comment that “he is dressed like a pader This was so because the bakers in Goa, who were also known as puder typically wore such half pants

 

  1. Where were the monthly accounts of the baker recorded?

Ans. The monthly accounts of the baker were recorded on some wall with pencil. Unlike today’s times nobody bothered to record it properly on a piece of paper. It was casually recorded on some wall and both the buyer and baker accepted the simple arrangement.

 

  1. What does a “jackfruit-like appearance mean?

Ans. A jackfruit-like appearance means a chubby and plump physique. The bakers were usually linked to such physiques as their profession was apparently, a profitable one and thus they ate well. Hence, the baker, his family, and his servants always looked well fed, happy and prosperous and had a jackfruit-like appearance.

 

  1. What is the attitude of the author towards the

Ans. The author has great regard and fondness for the baker. He thinks that his role is indispensible in the Goan community. He even describes some aspects of him, like his arrival and appearance humorously but is always affectionate and loving in his description of the baker.

 

  1. How would the bills be settled?

Ans. The amounts due from each household were recorded on some wall and the end of the month the bills were settled. Baking was a profitable business and the bakers were quite prosperous.

 

  1. The writer says that those eaters of loaves have. vanished. Explain.

Ans. The writer says this and refers to the Portug Portugese who once colonized Goa. Their love of bread still remains even though they have long left Goa. The tradition lives on and the sons of the bakers have carried on the bread making tradition faithfully.

 

PART-II: COORG

 

  1. Where is Coorg?

Ans. Coorg is the smallest district of Karnataka. It lies midway between Mysore and Mangalore. It is a hilly place of brave men, beautiful women and wild creatures. It is also known by the name of ‘Kodagu’.

 

  1. What is the story about the Kodavu people’s descent?

Ans. As per the legend, a part of Alexander’s army, when retreating from India, went South and settled in Coorg when they found that they could not return home. Then they married among the locals and their descendants are the “Kodavus

 

  1. What are some of the things you now know about

(i) the people of Coorg?

(ii) the main crop of Coorg?

(iii) the sports it offers to tourists?

(iv) the animals you are likely to see in Coorg?

(v) its distance from Bangalore, and how to get there?

Ans. The fiercely independent people of Coorg are possibly of Greek or Arabic descent. The main crop of Coorg is coffee. River rafting, canoeing, rappelling, rock climbing and mountain climbing and trekking are some of the sports that Coorg offers. Macaques Malabar squirrels, langurs and slender loris can be found here. Its distance from Bangalore is about 280 km. We can reach there through road, rail and air.

 

  1. Describe the wildlife of Coorg.

Ans. The wildlife of Coorg is quite diverse. It consists of animals like macaques, langurs, malabar squirrels, loris and elephants. The birds spotted in Coorg are kingfishers. Thus Coorg boasts of a thriving fauna in its lush jungles.

 

  1. Describe any two tourist places of Coorg.

Ans. Coorg has many places of tourist interest. Some of them are the Brahmagiri hills. The climb to these hills brings into panoramic view the entire misty landscape of Coorg. A walk across the rope bridge leads to the 64 acre island of Nisargadhama.

 

  1. Describe Coorg’s weather. When is it most pleasant for the tourists to visit Coorg?

Ans. The weather of Coorg is pleasant during the months from September to March. During that time, the weather is perfect with some showers thrown in for good measure. The pleasant weather makes it an ideal tourist destination.

 

  1. What is the place of the Coorg Regiment in the Indian Army?

Ans. The Coorg Regiment has a highly respected place in the Indian Army. It is one of the most decorated in the Indian Army. Also, the first Chief of the Indian Army, General Cariappa, was a Coorgi. This is possibly due to the fact that the Coorgis are by nature a martial race and do well in military services.

 

  1. Explain in brief the Coorgi people’s valour and bravery?

Ans. The Coorgi people are fiercely independent a brave. They are always willing to recount the tales of valour related to their sons and fathers. They a the only people in India permitted to carry firearm without a license.

 

  1. What are the high energy adventures that are available in Coorg?

Ans. The high energy adventures that are available in Coorg are river rafting, canoeing, rappelling, rock climbing and mountain biking. Trekkers too can have trek in the many walking trails that can be found here.

 

  1. How can one have a panoramic view of Coorg?

Ans. One can have the most breathtaking and panorame view of Coorg by climbing on to the top of the Brahmagiri hills which is a very popular touri destination of Coorg.

 

 

  1. What makes the Kodavus unique?

Ans. It is believed that the fiercely independent people of Coorg are descendants of Greeks or Arabs. A sectice of Alexander’s army moved south along the coast and settled here only when they were unable to retur to their country. These people married among the locals. This is the interesting story about the descent of Kodavu people.

 

PART-III: TEA FROM ASSAM

  1. What is the best time for obtaining the best tea from the tea gardens?

Ans. The best time for getting the best tea is between May to July. It is called the second flush’ in which tea leaves sprout. This is considered to be the best te produced in Assam.

 

  1. What are the various legends about the origin of tea?

Ans. There are many legends about the origin of tea According to a story, the tea was discovered in China. The Chinese Emperor used to drink boiled water. Once while boiling it, few leaves of a tw burning under the pot fell into it. The Emperor found the flavour delicious. Actually, they were tea leaves.

 

  1. Where were Rajvir and Pranjol going and why?

Ans. Rajvir and Pranjol were going to Assam as Pranjol had invited Rajvir to spend summer vacation there Rajvir was quite excited as he had never been to tea garden before. He had studied quite a bit about Assam and longed to experience it.

 

  1. What did Rajvir see while looking outside from the train?

Ans. Rajvir saw much greenery while looking outside from the train. He was amazed to see the soft green paddy fields first and then the green tea bushes. He saw the tea pluckers appearing to be like little dolls from far. He also saw a sea of tea bushes of the same size which appeared quite beautiful.

 

  1. This is a tea country now Explain this with reference to Assam.

Ans. Assam has the world’s largest concentration of tea plantations. A large number of tea gardens can be found there. Most of the tea grown in Assam is supplied all over the world.

 

  1. In what ways is China related to tea?

Ans. It is said that tea was first drunk in China. The words chai’ and ‘chini’ are from the Chinese language. There is also a legend about the Chinese emperor who always boiled water before drinking it. One day a few leaves of the twigs burning under the pot fell into the water giving it a delicious flavour. It is said they were tea leaves.

 

  1. Why did Pranjol’s father say that Rajvir had done his homework before visiting Assam?

Ans. Rajvir was very excited about visiting the tea garden and thus, he had studied a lot about it before visiting the tea garden. Thus, Pranjol’s father said that Rajvir had already done his homework before visiting Assam.

 

  1. Describe the scenery outside the train. Where were Pranjol and Rajvir going by train?

Ans. There were green, green forests everywhere. Rajvir had never seen such greenery before. He was going to Assam with his friend. Soon the soft green paddy fields gave way to tea bushes. Pranjol’s father Mr. Barua was the manager of a tea garden in Upper Assam.

 

  1. Why was Pranjol’s father surprised?

Ans. Pranjol’s father was surprised when Rajvir’s conversation with him revealed how much he knew about tea. He remarked that it was the second flush or sprouting period and that it lasted from May to July and yielded the best tea. This impressed Pranjol’s father.

 

  1. What is the Indian legend regarding tea?

Ans. The Indian legend regarding tea leaves is that Bodhidharma, an ancient Buddhist ascetic, cut off his eyelids. This was because he felt sleepy during the meditation. Ten tea plants, grew out of his eyelids. The leaves of these plants, when put in hot water and drunk, banished sleep.

 

TYPE III: LONG ANSWER QUESTIONS (100-120 WORDS EACH)

Answer the following questions:

 

PART-1: A BAKER FROM GOA

  1. Is bread an important part of Goan life? How do you know this?

Ans. Yes, according to the account written by Lucio Rodrigues, A Baker From Goa”, bread undoubtedly seems to be an important and inseparable part of Goan life. This is amply clear from the account of A Baker from Goa. It is not only a daily staple but is also a must for marriage gifts, parties and feasts and is made in a variety of shapes. The narrator mentions that bread is also needed by a mother for preparing sandwiches during her daughter’s engagement. Thus, it is necessary to have breads for every occasion, because of this the presence of a baker’s furnace in the village is quite indespensable.

 

  1. The account of the bakers of Goa is nostalgic and interesting Discuss.

Ans. Lucio Rodrigues A Baker from Goa’ is an observation of life of a typical baker and his place in the traditional Goan society. It is an engaging narrative which brings home to the readers the life and times of the traditional bakers who were an important and inseparable part of the life of this community. The author describes vividly the job, manners, and his indispensable role in Goan society. The description of the narrator’s excitement at the arrival of the baker to his home to deliver breads is extremely interesting. The bakers were usually had plump physiques as their profession was apparently a profitable one and thus they ate well. Hence, the writer humorously observes that the baker had a jackfruit-like appearance and his family, and his servants always looked well fed. and prosperous. All these delightful observations make the narrative quite and engaging as it presents to the reader a slice of Goan life which revolves around the baker.

 

  1. What importance does a baker enjoy in a Goan village?

Ans. A baker is very important and essential in a Goan village. He does not merely represent a profession but a highly admired Portuguese tradition. His brends are essential on each and every occasion. He enjoys respect and love of the people. The children consider him their friend, companion and guide. He is usually plump and has a jackfruit like appearance. He is much in demand not only to supply the daily bread but also to supply the special breads required on special occasions like marriages. He delivers his goods going from door to door. His arrival was eagerly awaited by the children and adults alike. On engagements of daughters, the lady of the house depended on him to supply the bread for the traditional sandwiches she was expected to make.

 

  1. Instead of enjoying their childhood, the children today are keen to enter adulthood. After reading about all the joys that the author Lucio Rodrigues had in his childhood, do you think such a keenness on the part of children is desirable?

Ans. In the chapter, the writer describes how spontaneously and simply they lived as children. It seems to be a world without pressures where children could be their natural selves without the burden of any goals to achieve. It is quite heartening that an ordinary event of the baker’s arrival in the house was enjoyed so much by the children. These days children are in a hurry to enter adulthood and have access to technology. Due to this they are learning things earlier than usual and getting matured beyond their age.

Hence, they are losing out their childhood and missing its joys. Children should grow at nature’s pace and enjoy their childhood to the fullest.

 

  1. The writer’s fondness and appreciation of a baker is evident from the account A Baker from Goa’. Comment.

Ans. In A Baker from Goa’ Lucio Rodrigues describes with a lot of appreciation a baker and his place in the traditional Goan society. It is an engaging narrative which brings home to the readers the life and times of the traditional bakers who were an important and inseparable part of the life of this community. Also it tells us much about the author’s own temperament. The author describes vividly the job, manners, and his indispensable role in Goan society. The description of the narrator’s excitement at the arrival of the baker to his home to deliver breads is extremely interesting. The bakers were usually had plump physiques as their profession was apparently a profitable one and thus they ate well. Hence, the writer humorously observes that the baker had a ‘jackfruit-like’ appearance and his family, and his servants always looked well fed, happy and prosperous. All these delightful observations show how the writer was fond of the baker. He seems to have a lot of love, fondness, and admiration for the baker.

 

PART-II: COORG

  1. Describe the Coorgi people and their descent.

Ans. The Coorgi people are fiercely independent brave. According to one theory, they are ofte descent. It is said that they are the successors a part of Alexander’s army who came to Southen India and settled there when return to their nat land became impractical. They then married amo the locals and got absorbed in the indigenous culture but their religious rites and traditions are disting from those of the Hindus. They are a martial r and they love to relate stories about the courage of their people. According to another theory, they of Arab descent. This is evident from the dress they wear. There is resemblance between “Kuppia, long dress that the Coorgis wear, and ‘Kuffia the the Arabs and Kurds wear.

 

  1. Comment on the writer’s admiration for Coorg.

Ans. The writer writes about Coorg with much fondnes

and admiration. This is due to the many attractions that the writer observed in the region. He tells us that Coorg is beautifully located and describes from as a piece of heaven that must have drifted the kingdom of God’. It has rolling hillsides with 1 pollution free river and forests teeming with wildlife The wildlife of Coorg is quite diverse. It consists of animals like macaques, langurs, Malabar squirrels loris and elephants. The birds spotted in Coorg are kingfishers. Thus Coorg boasts of a thriving fauna in its lush jungles. The writer is delighted to see that here nature exists in its pristine and diverse glory. Further, it has coffee and spice plantations, quite different from the rest of India. He has a lot of respect for the local people, the Kodavus, who are a martial race. They are well known for their hospitality. All these features of Coorg justify the writer’s admiration of Coorg.

 

  1. Where is Coorg situated? What is significant about it as a place deserving to be visited?

Ans. Coorg is situated midway between Mysore and the coastal town of Mangalore in the state of Karnataka It is a land of rolling hills, martial men, beautiful women and wild creatures. There are evergreen rainforests and sprawling coffee estates. It is also an ideal place for adventure sports like canoeing rappelling. One can see a variety of wild life in its lush forests. It boasts of interesting tourist places like the Brahmagiri hills and the beautiful island of Nisargadhama. Besides it is a land of beautiful courageous and martial people who are believed to have Greek or Arabic ancestry. So, it deserves to be visited.

 

  1. Why does the writer call Coorg a ‘piece of heaven? How is it justified?

Ans. Coorg is situated midway between Mysore and Mangalore and is described as a piece of heaven that must have drifted from the kingdom of god. It is also described as a land of rolling hills, martial men, beautiful women and wild creatures. It is the home of evergreen forests, spices and coffee plantations. It rains heavily during the monsoons and the visitors keep away. But the months from September to March are very pleasant. The air breathes of refreshing coffee. Thus Coorg boasts of a thriving fauna in its lush jungles. Here nature exists in its pristine glory, which adds to the diversity of India. Further, it has coffee and spice plantations, quite different from the rest of India. It is believed that the fiercely independent people of Coorg are descendents of Greeks or Arabs.

 

  1. How do Coorg’s location, people and natural features add to the diversity of India?

Ans. Coorg is beautifully located and described as a piece of heaven that must have drifted from the kingdom of God. It has rolling hillsides with a pollution free river and forests teeming with wildlife. The wildlife of Coorg is quite diverse. It consists of animals like macaques, langurs, Malabar squirrels, loris and elephants. The birds spotted in Coorg are kingfishers. Thus Coorg boasts of a thriving fauna in its lush jungles. Here nature exists in its pristine glory, which adds to the diversity of India. Further, it has coffee and spice plantations, quite different from the rest of India. The local people, the Kodavus, are a martial race. Of course, they are well known for their hospitality, just like all Indians. All these features of Coorg add to the diversity of our country.

 

PART-III: TEA FROM ASSAM

  1. What are the attractions of Assam?

Ans. Assam is world famous for its tea gardens and has the largest concentration of tea gardens in the world. Assam tea is considered to be the finest and is valued highly the world over. The plantations are spread over large tracts of land and are breathtakingly beautiful with the doll like’ people or the tea pluckers doing their jobs. The best tea is produced between May to July. It is the second flush and is the best quality tea produced in Assam. Tea pluckers with bamboo baskets on their backs, wearing plastic aprons plucking newly sprouted leaves make for a beautiful sight. The greenery of Assam is breathtaking. One can see sea of tea bushes stretched as far as the eye can see.

 

  1. What did Rajvir come to know about Assam?

Ans. Rajvir was quite excited and curious to know about Assam. He was going to Dekiabari to visit his friend, Pranjol’s tea plantations. He came to know that Assam is world famous for its tea gardens and has the largest concentration of tea gardens in the world. Assam tea is considered to be the finest and is valued highly the world over. Over eighty crore cups of tea are consumed every day throats or world. The sare spread over large e plantations are spread the land and are breathtakingly beautiful with the doll like people or the tea pluckers doing their tea to . The jobs second flush and is the best quality tea produced Tea pluckers with bamboo baskets on in Assam. their backs, wearing plastic aprons plucking newly sprouted leaves make beautiful sight. The greenery of Assam is breathtaking. One can see a sea of tea bushes stretched as far as the eye can see.

 

  1. How did Pranjol and Rajvir pass their time in the train?

Ans. Pranjol and Rajvir were travelling by train to Dekiabari to visit his friend, Pranjol’s tea plantations. While on the train Pranjol buried his nose in his detective book as he was fond of reading detective stories. Rajvir too was an ardent fan of detective stories, but at the moment he was keener on looking at the beautiful scenery outside. Rajvir was mesmerized by the lush greenery outside the train. It was green, green everywhere. Rajvir had never seen so much greenery before. Then the soft green paddy fields gave way to tea bushes. It was a magnificent view. Against the backdrop of densely wooded hills a sea of tea bushes stretched as far as the eye could see. Dwarfing the tiny tea plants were tall sturdy shade trees and amidst the orderly rows of bushes busily moved doll-like figures. He spotted a garden in which the tea pluckers were collecting tea leaves.

 

  1. Describe the scenery from the train that mesmerized Rajvir.

Ans. Rajvir was mesmerized by the lush greenery outside the train. It was green everywhere. Rajvir had never seen so much greenery before. Then the soft green paddy fields gave way to tea bushes. It was a magnificent view. Against the backdrop of densely wooded hills a sea of tea bushes stretched as far as the eye could see. Dwarfing the tiny tea plants were tall sturdy shade-trees and amidst the orderly rows of bushes busily moved doll-like figures. He spotted a garden in which the tea pluckers were collecting tea leaves. For him it was a new and most beautiful experience. He was going to Pranjol’s house

to see his father’s tea plantations. He had read a lot about the tea gardens but on seeing the gardens with

his own eyes filled him with delight and amazement. a Buddhist monk while meditating felt sleepy. To avoid it he cut his eye lids and threw them away. A few sapling sprouted out of them away. It is said they were tea leaves that banished sleep after boiling and drinking it.

 

  1. What myths are associated with the origin of tea?

Ans. About the origin of the tea it is said in Assam that The other under rrent story lies like this that a king in China was in the habit of drinking water after boiling it. Few twigs fell into his boiling water. After drinking it, his sleep went off. They called it tea. Tea was first drunk in China as far back as 2700 BC. ‘Chai’ & ‘chini’ words have their origin in China.

Tea from Assam is supposed to be the best kind of tea in the whole world. The best yield comes from May to July every year.

 

QUESTIONS FOR PRACTICE

 

  1. What does the writer say about the Tibetan settlement in Coorg.
  2. What other remains of the Portuguese days and culture are still found in Goa?
  3. Why was the baker a pleasant memory for the narrator?
  4. Why is Assam world famous?
  5. Describe the animals that can be seen and are available in Coorg.

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